New Law Untangles Health Care and Divorce

NEW LAW UNTANGLES HEALTH CARE DECISIONS FOR DIVORCING SPOUSES As of October 1, 2017, legislation that will likely change the drafting of separation and marital settlement agreements is in effect. This new law, is entitled Health Care Decisions Act – Advance Directives and Surrogate Decision Making – Disqualified Individuals. The new law imposes prohibitions on specific individuals from serving as health care agents or surrogate health care decision makers for their spouses. The individuals who would be disqualified are those who – in relation to the patient – are subjects of protective orders. But this new law goes beyond cases involving domestic violence. The new law also disqualifies a spouse when he or she has signed a separation agreement with the patient or when an application for divorce has been filed by either the patient or the spouse of the patient. The impact of this new law may only affect a small number of divorcing couples, but it is nevertheless an important change. While it is not a universal phenomenon, in the event of a serious medical crisis, most people who are separating or divorcing would prefer to have someone other than an estranged spouse serve as his or her health care agent or surrogate health care decision maker. Before this new law went into effect, a spouse was deemed to be automatically the first in line as a “surrogate decision maker” for health care matters if the patient had not previously executed an advance directive. The new law may permit a spouse to serve as a health care agent following the execution of a separation agreement or filing...

Adventures in Annapolis

At the stroke of midnight on April 10, the Maryland General Assembly concluded its work for the regular 2017 session. While the busy legislative season is officially over for the year, some legislators are suggesting that a special session may be on the horizon to address certain unfinished business dealing with obtaining licenses for medical marijuana and with terminating parental rights when children are conceived through nonconsensual sex. Calling for a special session is the prerogative of the Governor. While we can’t know if he will call for a special session, we are assured that Governor Hogan’s staff has been busily reviewing bills passed by the Maryland General Assembly to determine, among other things, that the bills meet the requirements of the United States and Maryland Constitutions. The final result of this review process will be concluded in May when we will know for sure which bills will receive the Governor’s approval, which bills will go into effect without his signature, and which bills will be vetoed. In the 2017 session, a great deal of attention was focused on earned paid sick leave, fracking, bail, and the looming presence of President Trump and the impact he may exercise in Maryland. Bi-partisanship was in evidence in terms of budget matters; the General Assembly passed a budget without a great deal of wrangling. Only a few family law bills made it through the legislative process. New definitions of child abuse and neglect and new protections for victims of sex trafficking were added to the Code. Domestic violence orders in protective order proceedings may be used as evidence to prove a ground...

The Other Capital

With the inauguration of Donald J. Trump as president this January, most of our collective political energy this winter will be focused on Washington, DC.  But as we all know, January also brings us the opening of the 90-day session of the Maryland General Assembly.  The Maryland General Assembly began officially on January 11, and although this is the third year of this Assembly, there are significant changes in the composition of legislators who will serve in the 2017 session.  These changes result mainly from the election of Senator Catherine Pugh as the new Mayor of Baltimore City because Mayor Pugh has engaged several of her former legislative colleagues to work with her administration.  In addition, certain legislators have resigned due to legal problems or illness. Others have been re-assigned to new committees. A new mix of members in the Assembly may prompt new approaches to legislative advocacy. One of the most important responsibilities of the Maryland General Assembly is to pass a budget, and this exercise will continue to engage the efforts of both the Assembly and Governor Hogan.  Other issues which likely will receive a good bit of attention this year include paid sick leave for Maryland workers, fracking, renewable energy, state-wide handling of rape kits, policing practices, management of transportation projects, and procedures for re-drawing Maryland’s congressional and legislative districts following the 2020 census. Advocates in the domestic violence arena will be initiating efforts to disqualify certain individuals from serving as either health care agents or surrogate decision makers for patients when these individuals are respondents in current protective order proceedings or if a divorce action has...

New Laws Go Into Effect on October 1

The recent modification of our laws by the Maryland General Assembly demonstrates the strong connection between criminal and civil law with regard to interpersonal and family relationships.  In 2016 General Assembly passed legislation that redefines the crime of stalking.  Stalking has been defined as “malicious course of conduct that includes approaching or pursuing another, where the person intends to place–or knows or reasonably should have known the conduct would place– another in reasonable fear of: serious bodily injury; an assault in any degree; rape or sexual offense or attempted rape or sexual offense; false imprisonment; or death.”   With the passage of this new legislation, effective October 1, our Code now includes language that the person charged with stalking “intends to cause or knows or reasonably should have known that the conduct would cause serious emotional distress.” What are the kinds of anti-social behaviors experienced by victims of stalking?  The Bureau of Justice Statistics, an agency of the U.S. Department of Justice, prepared a special report which identified and measured seven stalking behaviors that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. These behaviors include:   Making unwanted phone calls; Sending unsolicited or unwanted letters, e-mails, messages or texts; Following or spying on the victim; Showing up at places without a legitimate reason; Waiting at places for the victim; Leaving unwanted items, presents, or flowers; Posting information or spreading rumors about the victim on the internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth.   While these acts individually may not be criminal, collectively and repetitively these behaviors may cause a victim to fear for his or her safety...

Governor Hogan Signs Bills Passed in 2016

Managing in the Digital Age & Modernizing Divorce Law Over the past few weeks, Governor Hogan’s staff has been busily reviewing bills passed by the Maryland General Assembly at the close of the 2016 session to ensure, among other things, that the bills meet the requirements of the United States and Maryland Constitutions.  Then, in what is truly a joyous celebration of democracy, legislators and citizens gather in the Governor’s ceremonial chamber in Annapolis to witness the signing of various bills that will shortly be added to the Maryland Code. One of the more interesting bills passed by the Maryland General Assembly this year is the Maryland Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act.  This new law empowers us to appoint fiduciaries, typically agents, personal representatives, or trustees, to manage our digital assets.  Such assets in the form of computer files, e-mails, text messages, along with photos, videos, music and game files can be accessed not only by a person who created these assets but by another who is properly designated, consistent with the new statute.  Such access will eliminate the uncomfortable and painful continuation of digital assets long after death.  For example, it is not unheard of to get a LinkedIn notice five years after a person’s death about the person’s work anniversary.  With this new statute, such messages can be stopped. The ability to appoint another to act on one’s behalf through the appointment of a fiduciary is not a new legal concept, but as we all know, the march of technology and its widespread uses has changed the way we do business.  The opportunity to update estate...

A Clean Slate vs. Open Records – Weighing and Balancing

The end of the 2016 session of the Maryland General Assembly is rapidly approaching. Spring is in the air and because of the “blizzard of bills” that has been introduced, bills are now receiving either unfavorable votes in committee or winding their way through the labyrinth of procedural steps in the General Assembly. This year, there has been significant and sustained interest in a topic that affects all of us: the balance between the opportunity for a person to start over after making bad choices and the need for the public to access court records freely. All of this interest has been intensified by our collective use of and reliance on the internet as a way to get information quickly and easily. This issue finds expression in some basic questions: To what degree should the public have unfettered access to court records? When, if ever, is it appropriate to permit a person convicted of a criminal offense to ask the court to expunge (in other words to wipe away) the public record of the conviction? Is it important to have a permanent paper record in a court file of cases filed but, at the same time, limit publication of these court cases on the internet? The General Assembly has grappled with these questions in more than a dozen bills dealing with the topic of expungement of court and police records. Proponents who favor expungement argue that criminal records that cannot ever be erased create unreasonable barriers to jobs and housing. Such barriers prevent the successful re-entry of offenders into the community after they have paid their debt to society...